I think that I shall never see . . .

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All my feral cats are expert tree-climbers. They start practicing their tree-climbing skills at an early age. And they get pretty good at it, for cats.  But they’re no match for the squirrels and raccoons in that department.  All that practice has served Moo Cat well, since Scaredy Cat runs her up a tree just about every time Moo Cat comes into “her” territory. Poor ole’ Moo Cat.

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Moo Cat banished from the tribe

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I headed up to my campsite around midnight last night. Moo Cat was waiting for me in the darkness at the foot of the trail. She started meowing loudly as soon as she heard me coming.

Then she started darting back and forth rubbing against my ankles. As I walked up the trail in near total darkness I had to be careful not to step on her with my big clod-hopping shoes as she darted under my feet.

Moo Cat hadn’t had anything to eat in 4 days. So she was especially happy to see me. And my cat food. Ha ha.

The reason she hadn’t been fed is her own fault. She’s been banished from the tribe. Moo Cat can’t get along with any of the other feral cats. She’s always picking fights. She slashed Scaredy Cat in the face twice, one time she almost took her eye out. So finally Scaredy Cat had enough of Moo Cat’s shit. Now she runs her off every time Moo Cat shows up. Moo Cat flees in terror at the sight of Scaredy Cat. Which surprised me. Because Scaredy Cat is much smaller and younger than Moo Cat. And very gentle by nature. But in spite of her name, Scaredy Cat is fearless. Which is more than I can say for Moo Cat. Ha ha.
Anyways, I decided to set up my campsite by the creek (Moo Cat’s territory) so I could get some damn food in Moo Cat’s tummy. She immediately wolfed down an entire can of wet cat food, 3 hot dogs and some leftover chicken, along with a bowl of crunchy dry cat food. She was way hungry.

Then she made herself at home, lying on top of my chest on my blankets. Purring loudly. In between belching and making weird stomach-groaning sounds (she had really bolted down that food, ha ha).

The next morning when I woke up Moo Cat was still hanging around. Still purring loudly. One thing about feral cats. They can be way more appreciative than house cats. House cats just take it for granted that the food dish and the water dish is always there. Not so with feral cats. When you show up, it is like the cavalry coming to the rescue. You are Life itself. They literally jump for joy.

Moo Cat enjoyed a big breakfast. And then fled up the hill like a weeny as soon as Scaredy Cat sauntered onto the scene. Ha ha. Cats.

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The secret origin of Moo Cat

 

Image may contain: catOne of the cutest things I ever saw in all my years in feral catdom:

When Blondie had her first litter of kittens in 2007 she disappeared for a month. Then one morning she came back down to my campsite and started taking some of the cat food in the cat food dish back to her nest for her kittens. She’d carry the hotdogs in her mouth

Then, a couple days later, she led her kittens down to my campsite. That was really cute. They all came marching down the hill in a line behind Mom. Blondie looked just like a squad leader, leading her troops on an expedition. Ha ha.

When they finally got down to the cat food dish, Blondie basically said: “OK kids. Dig in!!”

That’s how I first was introduced to that crazy cat Moo Cat.

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The Cowardly Feline

 

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“Courage!”
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Moo Cat is such a coward. The other cats are always chasing after her and running her off because she acts like such an asshole. And she’ll go running down the hill with her tail between her legs, climb up a tree, and cower up there until the other cats finally leave her alone.

But you should have seen her last night. Oh, what a tough cat she was. It was around midnight and I put out some cat food for her, when this raccoon showed up and tried to horn in on the action. I shooed the raccoon away. And then I sort of stood there by Moo Cat’s side while she was eating, to guard the cat food and keep the raccoon at bay until Moo Cat was finished eating.

When she was done eating, I got in my sleeping bag, and Moo Cat sat on top of my chest. But when the raccoon returned, Moo Cat decided to show off her awesome power. She did this sort of fake-lunge in the raccoon’s direction. And then started growling fiercely at the raccoon, showing off her fangs to let the raccoon know she’d rip his lungs out if he made one more move in her direction.

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The raccoon did in fact back off and trot down the hill. But it was only because I — this 195 pound human being — was lying right behind Moo Cat backing her up all the way. If I hadn’t been there, you can bet Moo Cat would have been sprinting down the hill with her tail between her legs.

But you sure couldn’t tell Moo Cat that. She gave me this cocky, jaunty, “tough guy” look, like: “I sure showed that damn raccoon who was boss, huh?” Then she slept peacefully by my side for the rest of the night.

I swear to God, Moo Cat cracks me up.

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Loneliness

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Moo Cat. She pretty much hates everybody.

 

I’ve been lonely all my life. Even when I’m surrounded by people I’m still lonely.

I can be a fairly charming bastard (or at least I can fake it). And if I wanted to hang out with 20 “friends” I could pretty easily arrange it.

But there was just something off about me. I could never really connect with others. “We’re born alone. We live alone. And we die alone.”

That’s how its always been for me.

I guess that’s why Moo Cat has always had a special place in my heart. She can’t get along with ANY of the other feral cats. She’s a complete loner. Lives her life completely alone in total isolation.

Except she really likes me.

 

 

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